Dehydration Can Trigger Stress

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dehydration triggers stressStress are not only caused by problem at work or at home, lack of fluids can also lead to stress.

“Stress can cause similar symptoms like when we are dehydrated, such as increased heartbeat, nausea, fatigue, and headaches,” said Trent Nessler, Director of the Baptist Sports Medicine, United States.

Higher dehydration will trigger a decrease of consciousness or even brain damage because the brain is the most sensitive organ to water shortage. Water indeed has an important role in our body, as solvents, catalysts, lubricants, regulating body temperature, and the provider of minerals and electrolytes to the body. Thirst is an indication that the body is experiencing mild dehydration.

All parts of the human body needs water in all its activities. When there is less water content in each organ, its function will decrease. Besides being more easily exposed to bacteria and viruses, we are also susceptible to stress.

Many literature shows that a half liter lack of body fluids from our daily water needs, which is two liters, can raise levels of cortisol, one of the hormones of stres. Cortisol function is to release glucose into the bloodstream as energy. Cortisol hormones together with other stress hormones can interfere some body functions.

If it only happens one or two time, we don’t need to worry about it. But, if you are often dehydrated, of course, immune function can be affected.

This does not mean that if you drink excessive amount of water you can loose pressure in life. But if you have been dealing with stress, at least you will not get additional stress from dehydration.

“Weather we realize it or not, we become easily dehydrated when we are under pressure or stress. This occurs because heartbeat becomes rapid and breathing becomes heavy, so you lose fluid, “said Renee Melton MS RD, Director of Nutrition Sensei, a weight-loss program. When body and mind is dealing with something stressful, usually we will not remember to drink enough water. Wear In fact, water helps our concentration.

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