Lack of sleep makes teenagers vulnerable to obesity

Advertisement

Lack of sleep makes teenagers vulnerable to obesity

Teens have a lot of energy to do anything and maximize their potential. You could say, adolescence is also a time when a person is busy to interact, create, learn, and perform other activities so they have no time to rest. But the time for sleep is also important for teens. Lack of sleep can have a negative impact on the youth in the long term.

A study revealed that teens who sleep less than six hours each night were 20 percent more likely to be exposed to higher obesity as adults. At age 21 years, adolescents who sleep at least eight hours per night is more likely than adolescents who slim lack of sleep, as reported by the Daily Mail (8.21).

In this new study researchers from Columbia University and the University of North Carolina analyzed the health information of 10,000 Americans aged 16 years and followed them until age 21 years. Information on height and weight and sleep time is done with home visits in 1995 to 2001.

Approximately one-fifth of participants admitted sleeping less than six hours a night. The group is known to have an increased risk of obesity 20 percent higher when aged 21 years compared with their counterparts who sleep at least eight hours every night.

Lack of sleep affects appetite adolescents considered at noon. Additionally, when adolescents are sleepy during the day will be more likely to eat unhealthy foods. The results of this study makes the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States recommend teenagers to sleep at least nine to 10 hours every night.

“As an adult obesity will be more difficult to overcome. Increasingly parents when you are obese, the higher the risk of other diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. So the best way is to prevent it,” said Shakira Sugila, assistant professor at Columbia University .

Unfortunately, this study did not record food consumed by participants at the same beverages they drink. Currently researchers plan to investigate whether sugar-sweetened beverages associated with lack of sleep in adolescents and in turn impact on the increased risk of obesity.

Advertisement