Vitamin E supplements increase the risk of prostate cancer

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Vitamin E supplements Vitamin E supplements increase the risk of prostate cancer. Men who takes vitamin E and selenium supplements on a regular basis are more at risk of developing prostate cancer by two-fold. But it is also influenced by the amount of selenium that already exist in their bodies, according to a recent research.

Men who has a lot of selenium in their body are likely to experience prostate cancer up to two times if they are still taking supplements of selenium or vitamin E. This was discovered by researcher Dr. Alan Kristal of the Cancer Prevention program at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

The study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute also found that taking vitamin E supplements can increase the risk of prostate cancer if a person’s body lack selenium. According to Crystal, the real way to avoid this risk is easy, which is by not taking supplements of selenium or vitamin E supplements excessively.

“There is no clear evidence showing the benefit of vitamin E supplementation and selenium in high doses. So why do it?” Crystal said, as quoted by Health Day News.

Even so, Crystal explained that men could still take those multivitamin regularly. These results were found after researchers planned for 12 years but was discontinued in early 2008 after learning that there was no benefit of taking selenium and actually increase the risk of prostate cancer.

Then they performed data analysis on 3,117 men without prostate cancer and 1,739 men who had prostate cancer. They found that the amount of selenium in the body of participants turned out to affect the risk. Men with low levels of selenium and vitamin E have a risk of prostate cancer 63 percent higher and increase aggressive cancer up to 111 percent.

The results of this study should be considered if you have a habit of taking supplements of selenium or vitamin E every day. Note also the level of selenium in your body to avoid the risk of prostate cancer.

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